Seach, Social & Content Marketing Blog

Why a Content Calendar will be Critical in 2013

August 21st, 2012 • By:  • Content Strategy

Why a Content Calendar will be Critical in 2013

I’m sure you’ve heard that 2013 will be the year of content. If you haven’t, it’s time to jump on the bandwagon! Creating amazing content is becoming increasingly important to improve the authority and appeal of your website. Google’s algorithm updates, Panda and Penguin, are making it harder to maintain or improve your search engine rankings without great content. If you are consistently creating quality content, this will also tell Google to view you as a valid publisher, which can help with your overall SEO efforts.

Now the first thing you might be thinking is: “I have to start writing content? How do I do that? If you have a blog, you’re actually already doing it, but you may be missing out on how to get the most out of your efforts. The most important component of content creation is organization. This is where a content calendar (also called an editorial calendar) comes into play. A content calendar will help you organize your publishing schedule and create a consistent posting structure. As everyone starts their 2013 strategic planning, make sure to create a calendar to streamline and unify all of your content, social media, and promotional efforts. Keep reading to find out how to integrate one into your company’s marketing plan.

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The Worlds of Viral Video

August 17th, 2012 • By:  • Video Marketing

The Worlds of Viral Video

The term “viral video” comes with a certain preconceived definition for most of us: they are funny, quirky videos that spread across the Internet at a lightning fast pace. However, viral videos have evolved from their comedic beginnings to include a broad range of elements: poignant storytelling, the recording of current events otherwise not broadcasted, and brand launching capabilities.

Viral has changed the way we view video, sharpening our instincts to hone in on what is quality content or not in the span of only a few seconds, or as Arnie Kuenn wrote on his post Viral Marketing Campaign Success, content that is “genuine and believable.” For marketers, this can mean great things when reaching beyond existing customers to the masses, giving companies an opportunity to continually create interesting content for an engaged and curious audience.

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Robert Rose Discusses Content Marketing World’s Cage Match

August 16th, 2012 • By:  • Content Marketing

Content Marketing World 2012

Robert Rose and Arnie Kuenn discuss the World Cage Match at the upcoming Content Marketing World 2012 in Columbus Ohio.

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Should I Outsource My Social Media? [VIDEO]

August 15th, 2012 • By:  • Social Media

Q & A Video

Mike Huber answers: “Should I Outsource My Social Media?”

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Is Facebook Smart for Advertisers?

August 14th, 2012 • By:  • PPC Advertising
If you’ve been keeping up with the news at all, you’d know that Facebook’s had it rough as of late. Just last week their shares dropped to an all time low of less than $20 each, only adding to the stress they have experienced since going public. To make matters worse, three top execs, Ethan Beard, Katie Mitic and Jonathan Matus, have announced that they will be leaving the social giant in the weeks to come to pursue other ventures. In times like this, Facebook should be doing everything in its power to ensure its investors and advertisers that their money is being used wisely – but is it?
 
After admitting that they had under calculated their number of Monthly Active Users earlier this year, Facebook was already getting some flack from its advertisers. Later, when it came out that some PPC dollars might as well have been flushed down the toilet, things really began taking an ugly turn for the social networking site. This of course is in reference to the recent accusation that Facebook may have been delivering bot traffic to its advertisers, which may have resulted in false clicks and useless investments for thousands of these users.
 
The accusation was drawn by a small New York City based start-up company, Limited Run, which specializes in helping customers create their own online store platform. When Facebook’s web analytics tools were tracking less than a fifth of Limited Run’s PPC clicks the advertiser became skeptical. Understanding that this could have been due to sampling, the employees researched further to see what could be skewing their numbers. That’s when they discovered that nearly 80% of its Facebook ad clicks were being delivered from users who did not accept JavaScript – a key function that can determine whether a click is from a genuine human, or a bot.
 
Other PPC sites make money by delivering traffic for their advertisers, and while bot activity has become common everywhere, it is fairly easy to block this bad traffic. Once this activity has been detected, the PPC site can take the appropriate actions to ensure advertisers aren’t paying for bunk clicks. When JavaScript activity is dropped, some sites opt to bring the clicker to a special filter page where they have to prove that they are actually human. This helps prevent click-fraud up front, and then to take it a step further, most sites will do further reporting to remove a percentage of any other ads that appear to project suspicious activity.
 
In this instance, Facebook did not take the appropriate precautions to keep their advertisers safe, and now they are paying the price. Advertisers are losing trust in the popular social networking site. Facebook does not currently utilize a filtering system to identify potentially false activity, and their further reporting barely skims the surface to find bad activity. The number of users visiting the site means nothing to advertisers if the clicks that they are receiving are not legitimate, and Facebook is feeling the pressure to address the allegations that they are delivering thousands of clicks worth of false traffic.
 
Cynics say that while Facebook helps institute brand recall and recognition by promoting to fans and giving users the options to “like” the pages on the site, these people may not be becoming conversions on your website. There is no guarantee that they will purchase your product or benefit you outside of the Facebook realm. Keep this information in mind, and use caution when proceeding with your PPC campaigns. Whether you opt to use Facebook (who, might I remind you again, does not use a filtering system to detect bad activity) or another site, remember that conversions mean money and you should focus on utilizing channels that will result in profit for you. With all of the problems Facebook seems to be facing, it might be worth it to explore your options and find another medium that works for you and your campaign.